What Size Unit is Best for Your Business?

You’ve applied the marketing and customer service tips that you’ve read in our blog and your business is running full steam ahead. You’re getting new accounts and making more appointments. Now you have to keep up with demand. How do you know when it’s time to add or up-size your equipment to keep up with your expanding business?

Rules of Thumb:

  • If you have a 300-gallon spray unit, you can reasonably handle 200 accounts. If you have more than that, consider either using a larger unit or adding a unit to your fleet.
  • If you have a 400-gallon spray unit, you can expect to handle 350 to 400 accounts. If you grow beyond 400 accounts, you should consider either using a larger spray unit or adding a unit to your fleet.
  • If you have a 600-gallon spray unit, you can most likely handle 500 accounts. Anything beyond that, you will definitely need an additional spray unit.

Here is an example to help you generate your numbers:

  • If you have a 600-gallon unit and you spray 3 gallons per 1,000 feet, your unit will cover 200,000 sq. ft.

For example: The average lawn in the Atlanta metro area is 6,000 sq. ft. You would be using 18 gallons of product per customer (based on the 3-gallon per 1,000 feet rule). So you could potentially spray 33 yards per day with a 600-gallon unit.

  • The average charge per treatment is $45.00. If you multiply the price by the number of yards per day, you arrive at a daily revenue of $1485 ($45 x 33 = $1485). Be sure to factor in fuel costs or use the actual number of yards that you would spray in a day to get an even closer estimate of your revenue.
  • If you spray 5 days a week for a whole year, you could gross over $250,000 a year.
  • When you consider weather, holidays and maintenance,180 working days is a more realistic number. If you multiply your daily revenue by 180 you’ll arrive at a reasonable estimate of your annual revenue.

For smaller units, here are the numbers:
Again, you divide the number of gallons of your unit by the number of gallons of product you use per lawn to gauge your capacity.

  • If you have a 300-gallon unit, you could spray 16 yards per day based on the average 6,000 sq. ft. lawn.
  • If you have a 400-gallon unit, you could spray 22 yards per day.

Of course every region is different and no one can predict certain variables like fuel costs and weather. But using a little basic math and a few rules of thumb can help you determine when up-sizing your rig or expanding your fleet makes good, cost-effective sense.

If you have any questions, give us a call at 800-543-2810. We would be happy to discuss your growing business needs and how we can help you meet your customer demands.

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